NCSF on TwitterSubscribe to the NCSF RSS FeedNCSF Blog

NCSF Headlines

Media Updates

How To Make An Open Relationship Work

on Wednesday, 16 May 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

Complex Like any relationship, open unions don’t follow stringent guidelines. But when venturing into non-traditional territory, something like a rule book is more necessary than not. “Set the ground-rules for what actions and behaviors are allowed and disallowed under your open arrangement,” Courtney Clemen, founder of The V. Club, tells Complex. “It’s very important to think through all the scenarios and circumstances that could arise.” Couples should have a crystal clear understanding of what they are permitting each other to do, because the concept of sex is a broad spectrum and what’s OK and what’s not is subjective. Having agreeable rules ultimately minimizes feelings of insecurity, fear, and jealousy that can arise in an open relationship.

18 5 16

BDSM and consent: How to stop rough sex crossing the line into abuse

on Monday, 14 May 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

BBC News

"Consent should be freely given, and it should be reversible at any point," said Ms Martin, who is also executive director of the World Association of Sex Coaches. "Many people think that if you consent, that you agree until it's done, but that's not at all how it's done."

How to Have BDSM Sex That's Safe and Consensual

on Sunday, 13 May 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

Life Hacker

Here are some important consent ground rules to follow:

Your partner must clearly affirm their desire to engage in sexual activities with you. In other words, a lack of a “no” is not a “yes.”

Your partner must consent to every single activity that you engaged in together. Saying “yes” to having intercourse doesn’t imply that someone is also saying “yes” to being slapped in the face.

I like using the term “enthusiastic consent,” which means that not only is your partner willing to engage in these activities with you, but they’re also excited about it.

Your partner consents willingly, without pressure or coercion.

Consent can be revoked at any time.

Was it assault or kinky sex, Eric Schneiderman? Here's the difference

on Wednesday, 09 May 2018. Posted in NCSF in the News!, Front Page Headline, Media Updates

The Guardian

by Susan Wright

This Monday, Eric Schneiderman resigned as the New York attorney general after four women alleged that he had assaulted them. Two of the women claimed they had been “choked and hit repeatedly by Mr Schneiderman”, while another said she had been “violently slapped across the face”. A fourth woman alleged similar experiences.

In a statement issued on Monday, Schneiderman disputed the allegations, and seemed to imply that what had happened was part of kinky, rough sex: “In the privacy of intimate relationships, I have engaged in role-playing and other consensual sexual activity. I have not assaulted anyone. I have never engaged in nonconsensual sex, which is a line I would not cross.”

As a member of the BDSM community, I think its important to clarify the difference between rough sex and assault. In today’s post-50 Shades world, we all know there are many people who enjoy kinky sex and they like being called names or roleplaying. So you can’t judge the difference between rough sex and assault based on the behavior itself. The way you determine the difference is consent.

So the first step is to get specific agreement that this particular thing sounds hot and sexy and everyone involved wants to give it a try. Kinky people love to talk about what they want to do to each other. That’s our foreplay and we know the anticipation adds to the fun. But talking about what you like to do together is just the beginning. ...

Eric Schneiderman, Consent and Domestic Violence

on Wednesday, 09 May 2018. Posted in NCSF in the News!, Front Page Headline, Media Updates

NY Times Consent, the Dividing Line There is a bright line between pain caused by unwanted sexual or domestic violence and pain that can come during some kinds of consensual sexual activity among willing participants. “If it’s not consensual, then it’s not ‘rough sex.’ It’s abuse,” said Susan Wright, the founder of the National Coalition for Sexual Freedom, an advocacy organization for a diverse range of sexualities and sexual preferences. Consent should be given early and often, she said. Limits, risks and how to stop sexual activity should be discussed beforehand. And assumptions should never be made. “I know some people think it’s not sexy or spontaneous to actually talk about sex before you have it,” she said. “They’re absolutely wrong, because it’s the best foreplay in the world to talk about the things that turn you on and find out what things turn the other person on.” Even with consent, if sexual activity causes serious harm, it crosses the line to assault, she said.

Nico Tortorella Talks Polyamorous Marriage to Bethany Meyers: ‘We Allow Each Other Freedom’

on Tuesday, 08 May 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

US Weekly The All of It Is You: Poetry author noted that it’s “just trust.” He continued, “I mean we love each other more than anything and we allow each other freedom to explore ourselves. Before anything, we’re individuals and together we’re a unit and it’s unstoppable for us.”

How To Write A Dating App Bio For An Open Relationship That's Fully Transparent

on Tuesday, 08 May 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

The Elite While you don't necessarily need to slap this information on your Tinder bio, it would be nice to mention it early and definitely before going on a date. "Not everyone you meet online or in person is going to be as psyched about non-monogamy as you are," Blue adds. "This is okay! A good way to handle these initial conversations is to invite potential dating partners to have a conversation about what your open relationship means to you. The key is to invite rather than impose."

Lawyer Fired After Sending BDSM Sex Contract To Junior Employee. Naturally He Sues.

on Sunday, 06 May 2018. Posted in Front Page Headline, Media Updates

Above the Law

“I had a consensual BDSM relationship with another employee, which included one brief incident in private on work premises several months before the disciplinary proceedings,” he added.

“I believe that the disciplinary proceedings were brought against me as retaliation for my having handed in notice following a disagreement over salary and not as a result of the much earlier incident.”

<<  1 [23 4 5 6  >>